Jen deHaan

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  • in reply to: Adopt A Grain Project #9292
    Jen deHaan
    Participant

    Yes!! I love all the hairs. So neat to see what we usually don’t get to see 🙂

    in reply to: WK2: Growing Heritage Grains #9249
    Jen deHaan
    Participant

    British Columbia, Canada.

    The main crops are canola, wheat, barley and oats. Most are for export or livestock feed, and 80% is grown in one single area of our province (Peace River). Our wet climate is a major limiting factor (article).

    Sidenote, I also know from locals that organic hay/straw is very difficult to come by due to our climate and growing limitations.

    Historically these same crops were grown, but it doesn’t sound like on much scale due to the competition with the prairies.

     

     

    in reply to: What I grow #9244
    Jen deHaan
    Participant

    Also wanted to add a special shout out to Homs Kousa squash. It’s a Syrian variety from EFN, helping the seeds live on until they can be rematriated. They grew absolutely outstanding in the temperate rainforest this summer, vastly outperforming zucchini. I will grow this squash and save seed every year I reckon based on how well it did, how wonderful they are to cook with, and how well and long they store as summer squash. They were so bountiful I missed bagging many flowers that grew into squash to eat, but still have a large number of isolated flowers to save seed from too (can’t wait to weigh some of the huge squash!). Vines, flowers, and fruit grew right up until the weather turned toward frost.

    in reply to: What I grow #9238
    Jen deHaan
    Participant

    We are about to put in garlic as well! I do mostly porcelains, but also have French and Saltspring Giant (like elephant garlic). For the winter I have a selection of radish, perennial kale, perennial nine star broccoli, chard, lettuces, evergreen onions, wintering bulb onion, overwintering shallots, carrots, kholrabi, cauliflower, and a couple cabbage types. We’re just getting our first frosts early this year and everything looks so sad. Major cleanup duty right now along with processing mayhem.

     

    Editing to add – I just tried our chimayo pepper powder on popcorn and *oh my goodness so good*. The chimayos were amazing this year – did better than every other pepper in our climate, which was a happy surprise. Just finished processing them yesterday.

    • This reply was modified 11 months, 2 weeks ago by Jen deHaan.
    in reply to: No-till Farming #9236
    Jen deHaan
    Participant

    Thanks so much! I’ve switched entirely to growing for seed (and personal consumption), since I am shielding due to health concerns and not attending farmers markets anymore. A fun new adventure and so much more meaningful. Big change, but challenge will be worth it 🙂

    I just looked up Lummi Island! I remembered the name but forgot exactly where it was in relation to Vancouver Island. I hope that you get to visit your cousin one day soon!

    in reply to: Recipe and Resource Share #9234
    Jen deHaan
    Participant

    Here’s one of my barley recipes! Making this one again, and thought of this thread. Mushroom and Barley stew primary ingredients include barley, squash, beets, carrots, onions and mushrooms with turmeric, garlic and mushroom broth as primary flavors. Lots of substitutions and additions obviously work with this.

    https://www.plantbasedrecipe.com/articles/vegan-winter-stew-recipe/

    • This reply was modified 11 months, 2 weeks ago by Jen deHaan.
    • This reply was modified 11 months, 2 weeks ago by Renee Fourie.
    in reply to: Adopt A Grain Project #9232
    Jen deHaan
    Participant

    Week 2 – Purple Valley Barley

    • What is the Latin name? Hordeum vulgate
    • What is the chromosomal count? 14, diploid
    • What are the ideal growing conditions? This one is best sown in spring, it will grow in cool ground (cool season). Short season. Prefers dry, and full sun to partial shade.
    • How is it pollinated? Self pollinated with some wind pollination
    • What is the breeding system? Self pollination
    • Any specific characteristics of the grain you have chosen. 6 row and less prone to lodging than other purple barley varieties.

    in reply to: Adopt A Grain Project #9083
    Jen deHaan
    Participant

    Week 1  – Purple Valley Barley

    What grain are you choosing and what attracted you to it?

    I originally heard Bill talking about Purple Tibetan Barley on a podcast, and I wrote down the name to learn more and find sources for it. I ran across Purple Valley barley at Adaptive Seeds, which is a company I regularly purchase from so I decided to try it. It’s best spring planted, so will be growing it for the first time next spring.

    Fun Fact

    This variety was developed in Oregon, may have been selected from Tibetan Purple, and is less prone to lodging.

    Photo

     

    in reply to: Adopt A Grain Project #9082
    Jen deHaan
    Participant

    AAG_Jen_PurpleValleyBarley

    in reply to: No-till Farming #9076
    Jen deHaan
    Participant

    I grew pseudograin Amaranth using no dig/no till stockfree practices, which is what I have practiced for 4 years now.

    in reply to: Germination Test Discussion #9075
    Jen deHaan
    Participant

    I’m testing three very different things. Lettuce seed I collected this year (Cracoviensis), an upright ground cherry I grew for Seeds of Diversity this year, and Purple Valley barley. 25 lettuce seeds, 25 barley seeds, 50 ground cherry seeds.

    • This reply was modified 11 months, 3 weeks ago by Jen deHaan.
    in reply to: PRE-REQ/WK1: Introduce Yourself! #8715
    Jen deHaan
    Participant

    Hi everyone!

    I am Jen from Errington B.C. in Canada, Komoks, Kwalikum, and Snaw-naw-as territories. I have been a market gardener for a little bit, starting from scratch on this land in late 2017 using no dig stockfree practices from the beginning. I have always lived in the middle of large cities in very different climates without a yard, so moving to 10 acres has been a journey in itself.

    I shifted to growing for seed last year, and actively working on expanding our growing space this year. Lots of setbacks, like our heat dome in late June this year. Focus is on open source, landrace, and rare heritage varieties. Very interested in breeding for open source. Just started working on a tomato breeding project this year.

    I am very new to grains and grasses. This year I grew Opopeo Amaranth, and I have purple barley for next year. Looking forward to learning lots and meeting all you lovely people in this course!

    Amaranth

Viewing 12 posts - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)