Adopt A Grain Project

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    • #8720
      Renee Fourie
      Keymaster

      You will select a grain to ‘adopt’ and research throughout the course. Each week you will be prompted to investigate something specific about the grain and upload it to the Discussion Forum. At the end of the course you will have a created a comprehensive portfolio of your chosen grain!

      WEEK 1:

      • Reply to this Adopt A Grain Topic post and type using the format “AAG_FirstName_GrainVarietyName”. Here you are creating a new thread and this is where your personal Adopt A Grain project will live. Make sure to submit this response.
      • Reply to that post. In the first line of the Body Paragraph type “Week 1  – GrainVarietyName“. Hit enter to start a new line and respond to the following prompt – What grain are you choosing and what attracted you to it? Share a fun fact. Upload a photo or drawing of the grain.

      WEEK 2:

      • Reply to the Adopt A Grain (AAG) thread you created. In the first line of the Body Paragraph type “Week 2 – GrainVarietyName“. Hit enter to start a new line and respond to the following prompt – Using the Grains Short Course as one of your references, please answer the following for your adopted grain:
        What is the Latin name?
        What is the chromosomal count?
        What are the ideal growing conditions?
        How is it pollinated?
        What is the breeding system?
        Any specific characteristics of the grain you have chosen.

      WEEK 3:

      • Reply to the Adopt A Grain (AAG) thread you created. In the first line of the Body Paragraph type “Week 3 – GrainVarietyName“. Explore the seed lineage, migration, and history, and summarize. Where does the story begin with your grain; what’s the deeper story?

      WEEK 4:

      • Reply to the Adopt A Grain (AAG) thread you created. In the first line of the Body Paragraph type “Week 3 – GrainVarietyName“. Many ancient and heritage grains are low in gluten allergens. Why do you think this is the case? Research and see if your chosen grain holds promise for the gluten-intolerant, and any other nutritional positives or negatives you discover.
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    • #8746
      Renee Fourie
      Keymaster

      AAG_Renee_Khorasan

      • #8748
        Renee Fourie
        Keymaster

        Week 1 – Khorasan

        I choose Khorasan because I want to learn more about the origins, and I know that there is an interesting story regarding why it is also called Kamut.

        kamut      khorasan

        • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 6 days ago by Renee Fourie.
        • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 6 days ago by Renee Fourie.
        • This reply was modified 1 week, 6 days ago by Renee Fourie.
      • #9226
        Renee Fourie
        Keymaster

        Week 2 – Khorasan

        What is the Latin name? Triticum turgidum ssp. turanicum; Triticum turanicum
        What is the chromosomal count? 2x = 4n = 28 chromosomes (Tetraploid)
        What are the ideal growing conditions? A temperate continental climate, cooler nights, low humidity and precipitation rates, and a sunny warm summer, and soil high in selenium
        How is it pollinated? Self-fertilized
        What is the breeding system? Self-fertilized
        Any specific characteristics of the grain you have chosen. Compared to the common wheat (hexaploid), khorasan wheat is a tetraploid with fewer chromosomes and grains double in size, more drought-tolerant, tastier, and loaded with nutrition. Kamut is trademarked and sold in the US to ensure that the production/sale adheres to particular guidelines:

        1. Be the pure ancient khorasan variety of wheat
        2. Be grown only as a certified organic grain
        3. Have a protein range of 12% – 18%.
        4. Be 99% free of contaminating varieties of modern wheat
        5. Be 98% free of all signs of disease
        6. Contain 400 to 1000 ppb selenium
        7. Not be used in products that are named or marketed in a misleading or deceptive manner

        Reference Kamut International

        • This reply was modified 1 week, 6 days ago by Renee Fourie.
        • This reply was modified 1 week, 6 days ago by Renee Fourie.
      • #9229
        Renee Fourie
        Keymaster

        Week 3 – Khorasan

        Explore the seed lineage, migration, and history, and summarize. Where does the story begin with your grain; what’s the deeper story?

        The Greater Khorasan region is the namesake of this grain, an area of the fertile Crescent encompassing parts of Iran, Afghanistan, and Turkmenistan. In Persian, khor translates to ‘sun’ and asan translates as ‘to come to’ – the grain is connected to additional descriptive names like Camel’s Tooth, Oriental, and King’s Tut wheat. As I reflected on its various names throughout history, so much is already being told about its story. It tells that the grain likes to grow in the sun. We are able to understand the culture of the khorasan seed stewards since they compared the kernels to something familiar: camel’s teeth. Also, these were typically sent/grown from eastern neighbors. And a more recent story, khorasan also gets the name of King Tut’s wheat by way of the myth of how these grains arrived in the US.

        The myth begins with a US Airman who grabbed a bag of these grains from an Egyptian tomb after WWII, sharing 36 kernels with a friend who sent them to his farming father in Montana. The grains were grown, shared, and nearly forgotten before catching the eye of a young farmer named Bob Quinn. From there, trademarked Kamut eventually came into existence and is being grown by certified organic farmers in Montana, Alberta, and Saskatchewan.

        • This reply was modified 1 week, 6 days ago by Renee Fourie.
    • #8768
      frances_craik
      Keymaster

      AAG – Frances Craik – Wheat, Einkorn

      • #8769
        frances_craik
        Keymaster

        Week 1 –

        I am choosing to research Einkorn Wheat because I want to learn more about it! Einkorn wheat is supposedly the most nutritious wheat containing high protein levels and a balanced blends of fats, vitamins, and minerals that give it a delicious flavor and versatility for baking. A fun fact is that Einkorn Wheat needs to be de-hulled before being milled or prepared to eat, though grass roots plant breeders have been working on a free-threshing variety called Black and Tan Einkorn!

    • #8792
      Randy Olivier
      Participant

      AAG_Randy_Clarks Cream

    • #8793
      Randy Olivier
      Participant

      Clark's Cream seed picture

    • #8794
      Randy Olivier
      Participant

      Being new to the field of grains, I decided to take a trip to Belle Valley Ancient Grains just outside of Newell, SD. I had some real estate signs to attend to in the nearby town of Belle Fourche, so I thought I could make it a work trip! If you have not visited a small ancient crop producer, I would strongly encourage it! Brian Stambaugh took me on a personal tour of his (and his wife Linda’s) operation and it was incredible. His passion and knowledge for the organic grains he produces was first class. (Spelt, Emmer, Einkorn, Red Fife, White Sonora and Clark’s Cream)
      While I will be baking bread with Einkorn and Red Fife this week (from my grain purchases from Belle Valley), my adopt a grain project will revolve around Clark’s Cream, named after Earl Clark from Kansas. While red wheat is always thought of as the “healthy choice” on the grocer’s shelves, I want to give white bread a good name in our household. Clark’s Cream is a hard…white….wheat! Haha! Kids will love it! And so will mom!

      • #8808
        Randy Olivier
        Participant


        Clark's Cream - Germination Test - Day 3
        Clark’s Cream Hard White Winter Wheat – 3 full days of germination.  While I had to examine a couple of the grains closely, I discovered that 60 out of 60 of the grains that I had inserted into the germination test did, in fact, germinate.  Placed 60 seeds upon a dampened paper towel in 1 inch apart horizontal and vertical rows, then another paper towel atop.  Once inside the Ziploc, then dampened the second/top paper towel and then repeated this for two nights.  (100 would have potentially been too many too close together and where I wanted to place them in a 1 gallon Ziploc sealable plastic bag, 60 was my numeric!)  On night three (tonight) I opened up and removed the paper towel with seeds and discovered 100% germination.  Placed the paper towel and seeds back in the Ziploc and mist sprayed again and into the dark enclosed space.  Will plant in 3 to 4 rows in the garden tomorrow afternoon as they are winter wheat.  I have never done a seed germination process, so this has been a fun experiment.  Growing winter wheat will also be a new gig and I look forward to perhaps trying two more wheat varieties in the same fashion and in the coming week.

      • #8879
        frances_craik
        Keymaster

        Hi Randy,

        Awesome choice. I have never heard of Clark’s cream. It is a hard white wheat? Is it winter or spring planted? Is it a hulless variety? I am so curious!!

        I just visited a local farm / mill operation in Lapeer, MI. Doug is the owner, farmer, and miller of Stonycroft Farms and he does it because he loves it, it’s a hobby for him. I have yet to bake with the flour that I received from him.

        So glad you had germination success; wasn’t it easy?!

      • #9074
        Randy Olivier
        Participant

        Clark’s Cream is a hard white winter wheat originating in Kansas and now grown organically in South Dakota.  It has a mild and sweet flavor and performs well in sourdoughs, enriched bread doughs, pasta, bagels, cookies and muffins.  It’s protein is 10.8%.  It has a hull so it takes the extra step in processing.

      • #9237
        Randy Olivier
        Participant

        What is the Latin name? the species name is Triticum aestivum
        What is the chromosomal count? I am asking the farmer who introduced me.
        What are the ideal growing conditions? It is a white, hard winter wheat.  Planted in August/September.  Cultivates June/July.  The field I saw it in is flat, close to a river (for irrigation), and surrounded partially by tree breaks (cutting down wind).  South Dakota can be 110 degrees F in the Summer and -30 degrees F in the Winter; so it seems to be a pretty hardy plant!
        How is it pollinated?  Self
        What is the breeding system?  Self
        Any specific characteristics of the grain you have chosen.  8th generation.  Black hull.  My goal is to follow what I have learned in the Week 3 lessons – cull and save the largest seeds, replant, repeat for 3 years – and then see how the pounds per acre improves and if we get a new count on the protein, etc.  PLEASE HELP ME HERE IF I AM MISINTERPRETING SOMETHING HERE>

        Not exactly ancient wheat, but currently grown by a farmer in Western South Dakota who also grows ancient wheat.

        Date of Release:  1972

        Developer and location:  Earl G Clark, Sedgwick, KS  – In  1912, fifteen-year-old Earl Clark of Kansas noticed a plant with unusual black wheat kernels.  He saved three of these seeds to replant.  The resulting “Blackhull” variety accounted for a third of the Kansas crop in the 1930s.  Clark developed other varieties including KanKing – also derived from seeds from a single plant crossed with Blackhull descendants.  Developed over eight generations, with lineage traced back to the original black seeds in 1912, Clark’s Cream was released in 1972.

    • #8956
      Peggy Ahola
      Participant

      AAG_Peggy_Tibetan Purple 2 Row Barley

    • #8957
      Peggy Ahola
      Participant

      Week 1

      I choose Tibetan Purple 2 row Barley because I just planted it on 9/28.  This is my first time trying to grow this grain.  My research said to plant it 1″ apart with rows 6″ apart.  I am growing it in a raised bed and went with 2″ spacing in rows 3″ apart.  There were 57 seeds in the packet that I got from the Heritage Grain Trails from Rocky Mountain Seed Alliance.

      Seed packet photo

      • #8963
        Jessy Swisher
        Participant

        Peggy, I am glad that you are going to do the Tibetan Purple Barley.  I was going to do this since I also just planted it in my garden in Pennsylvania.  But I chose to switch gears to focus on my huauzontle, which is ready to harvest now.  I will look forward to learning about this crop from you.  Although, I bought the 6-row barley, and I wonder what differences there might be between the two?  I see you are located in Sedona, AZ, so will be curious to know how the crop fares in my climate as compared with yours.  Cheers!

      • #9062
        Peggy Ahola
        Participant

        one week after plantingOne week after planting

      • #9071
        frances_craik
        Keymaster

        Peggy it looks like you’re having beautiful germination success! The Tibetan Purple is a gorgeous grain. The difference between the 2-row an 6-row (I think) is how the seed forms in the head! That would be a good question to bring up in class today!

    • #8961
      Jessy Swisher
      Participant

      AAG_Jessy_Huauzontle

      • #8962
        Jessy Swisher
        Participant

        Week 1 – Huauzontle

        two plants

        I chose huauzontle because it is currently growing in my garden and I think it is about time to harvest it.  Need to do some research on it ASAP!  Huauzontle is a Mexican grain crop similar to amaranth.  I bought the seeds from Roughwood Seed Collection.  The leaves and flowers went from all green to all red.  The photo is of only two plants that developed from two single seeds.

      • #9153
        Renee Fourie
        Keymaster

        Amazing! Such a vibrant color. What a bounty from just 2 seeds. I am interested in learning more about Huauzontle.

    • #8964
      Nathan Sieler
      Participant

      AAG_Nathan_JonesFifeWheat

      • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 1 day ago by Nathan Sieler. Reason: changed form Keldin Red since learning that it is PVP protected, so I wouldn't care to grow it
      • #8965
        Nathan Sieler
        Participant

        Week1 – JonesFifeWheat

         

        I am choosing Jones Fife Wheat, because it was one of the most popular wheats grown in my state in the 1919 USDA wheat variety bulletin.   I believe that it is a hard red winter wheat, which I suspect will do better in my region than the other popular wheats which were spring wheats, since we get most of our annual precipitation in the winter and spring.

        jones fife wheat(photo source – great lakes staple seeds)

      • #9150
        Nathan Sieler
        Participant

        Week 2 – JonesFifeWheat

         

        Latin name – I believe that it shares the latin name of other wheats, Triticum aestivum

        Chromosomal count – Wheat has a chromosomal count of 42

        Ideal growing conditions – From interpreting the 1922 USDA Bulletin, Classification of American Wheat Varieties, it would appear that it likes mildly cold winters with moderate amounts of precipitation and dry summers.  I am assuming this based on the location that is most grown.   The bulletin says “plant winter habit” which I believe means that it is a fall planted winter wheat

        Pollination – self-pollinated

        Breeding characteristics – it apparently is a cross made by A.N. Jones of Newark, New York that comes from “Fultz, Mediterranean and Russian Velvet”

        Other characteristics– it is sold by Great Lakes Staple Seeds who markets it as a Soft Red Winter Wheat

      • #9259
        Nathan Sieler
        Participant

        Week 3 – JonesFifeWheat

         

        From Bulletin 1074 – Jones Fife was created by A.N. Jones in Newark, N.Y. in 1889.  It is a descendant of Fultz, Mediterranean, and Russian Velvet varieties. By 1919, 215,900 acres of it were being grown in Eastern WA, where I currently live. It was the 4th most popular variety in the state, behind Baart, Marquis and Gold Coin.  One of its synonyms is “Burbank Super”, after the famous plant breeder, Luther Burbank.  In Burbank’s 1917 catalog, he listed it (or an identical grain) under the title “The New Burbank Wheat” and claimed it was the best performer out of the 68 other wheats he had tested.  “the growth is strong, 4ft on good ordinary soil, tillers unusually well, and on ordinary valley soil, without special cultivation, care or fertilizing.”  According to the 1074 bulletin, is performed poorly outside the pacific region.  However, in Montana, it has another synonym, known as Crail Fife after local Bozeman farmer Frank Crail who grew and distributed it under that name and had good success with it.  It seems possible that “Burbank Super” is a similar but different variety that is less cold hardy than “Crail Fife”

    • #8970
      Bev Sturgis
      Participant

      AAG_Bev_BlackMilo

      • #8971
        Bev Sturgis
        Participant

        Week 1

        I have tried three kinds of sorghum over the last couple of years to see what grows well in southwest Missouri. This year I am growing Black Milo. I purchased the seeds from Siskiyou Seeds. It is a tall, beautiful plant with shiny black seeds.  Surprisingly the birds don’t seem interested in it. I’m anxious to harvest some and try cooking with it.

      • #8972
        Bev Sturgis
        Participant

        black milo

      • #9155
        Renee Fourie
        Keymaster

        Black Milo really is a beautiful plant. Funny that the birds do not go after them because I know this variety has been used in some bird feed! How are you planning to cook the Black Milo?

      • #9185
        Bev Sturgis
        Participant

        I will try to mill it into flour and try baking with it. I think I’ll try using it in a stew too.

      • #9138
        Bev Sturgis
        Participant

        Week 2 – Black Milo

        Latin name: Sorghum bicolor

        Chromosomal count: 2n=20

        Ideal growing conditions: Sorghum is adapted to hot, dry conditions.

        Pollination: It is both self-pollinated and wind-pollinated.

        Breeding system: primarily self-pollinated

        Specific characteristics: Viable seeds may be obtained from one plant. However 10-25 plants should be grown for variety maintenance, and 50 plants should be grown for genetic preservation.

        * Most of the above info was obtained from The Seed Garden published by Seed Savers Exchange, Decorah, Iowa.

      • #9260
        Bev Sturgis
        Participant

        Week 3 – Black Milo

        Sorghum bicolor is an important food crop in Africa, Central America, and South Asia. It is the 5th most important cereal crop grown in the world. This species is thought to have been domesticated in northern Africa and independently in China and Sudan. There were centuries of disruptive selection and isolation which helps explain the varied types of sorghum used for grain, syrup, broom-making, hay, and pasture.

        There are many other species of sorghum found in Australia, Africa, India, Madagasar, Thailand, Myanmar, islands of the Indian Ocean, and elsewhere.

        On a more personal note, my grandfather grew up on a Texas ranch. There was a sorghum pressing operation nearby and his family got all their sweeteners from that place. My mother says my grandfather grew tired of sorghum sweeteners and would never use it again once he became an adult.

      • #9372
        Bev Sturgis
        Participant

        Week 4 – Black Milo

        The older wheats have fewer chromosomes than modern wheats do, so older wheats and modern wheats have very different genomes. The base pairs in a cell’s DNA code for the production of various amino acids. These amino acids join to form various proteins. It makes sense that a different genome coding for different amino acids would result in the formation of different proteins. Some specific proteins are the cause of gluten allergies, and their production is different in older wheats vs. modern wheats.

        Sorghum bicolor is high in protein but does not contain the problematic proteins found in wheat, barley, and rye. This makes it an ideal source of protein for people with gluten intolerances.

    • #9049
      Linda DeWitt
      Participant

      AAG_Linda_Amaranth

      • #9050
        Linda DeWitt
        Participant

        I am choosing amaranth because quite frankly I always thought it was a flower so clearly I have a LOT to learn!

      • #9169
        Linda DeWitt
        Participant

        Linda_AAG_Amaranth

        Latin name: Amaranthus hypochondriacus (does that make me a hypochondriac?)

        Chromosome ct: 2n=32

        Ideal growing conditions:  We’ll drained soil in full sun, may be drought tolerant after established

        How pollinated:  mainly self pollinating but  wind and insect pollination can occur

        Breeding system:  monoecious

        Special characteristics:  gluten free edible seeds and leaves can be eaten fresh or cooked.  High in protein and lysine (essential amino acid not manufactured by body so derived from food or supplements.)

      • #9170
        Linda DeWitt
        Participant

        Linda_AAG_Amaranth

        My definition of a landrace seed is one that has been grown hopefully for some time and has adapted to my environment, specifically my soil; my farming/gardening tendencies; climate changes.  The greatest advantage is having results that are ever changing and able to survive for years to come.

    • #9064
      Ashley Overstreet
      Participant

      AAG_Ashley_Red Fife Wheat

      • #9072
        Ashley Overstreet
        Participant

        Week 1

        I selected Red Fife wheat because I grew it this year and will be baking with it soon. This is my second round of growing/baking with it, but the first time was more of a novelty. I’d never grown grains and wanted to see if I could, how it compared to vegetable growing, whether I could grow enough for a loaf of bread, etc.

        I read that Red Fife was the “industry standard” wheat until the early 1900s and then it dropped off fairly quickly. The data in the USDA Classification of Wheat Varieties for 1939 seems to back up that decline, “The area of Red Fife decreased from 749,600 acres in 1919 to 3,884 acres in 1939” (pg. 75). I don’t see Colorado (where I live) as one of the states where it was grown in the bulletins, but I’ve heard there are a couple of farmers in my county growing it now.

        Below is a photo of Red Fife growing in my raised bed garden over the summer.

      • #9231
        Ashley Overstreet
        Participant

        Week 2

        Latin name: Triticum aestivum

        Chromosome count: 42

        Ideal growing conditions: Can be grown as winter or spring wheat, full sun, well-drained soil, an inch of rain per week (though we watered ours more this summer)

        How pollinated: Self-pollinated

        Breeding system:  Self-pollination

        Specific characteristics: Red Fife has a lower gluten content than many other varieties of wheat. I’ve read that it can often be tolerated by those with wheat sensitivities (not Celiac disease)

      • #9252
        Ashley Overstreet
        Participant

        Week 3

        I found a couple of different stories about the origins of Red Fife wheat, but isn’t that what every internet search yields? I figured I’d consult the USDA publications to eliminate some of the extraneous material. Funnily enough, the USDA Bulletin 1074 also mentions the fact that there are several conflicting stories about Red Fife’s introduction into North America. It says that Red Fife was introduced into the US by way of Germany, Scotland, and Canada. As for an origin story, it says the “most authentic” version is that David Fife of Otonabee, Ontario, Canada received some seeds in 1842 from a friend in Glasgow, Scotland. The sample was supposedly from Russia by way of Danzig, Germany (now Gdańsk, Poland). Fife sowed it in the spring, but it was actually a winter wheat (now it can be grown at either time, depending upon where you live). From this wheat descended what we now know as Red Fife. (Paraphrased from pg. 92 of USDA Bulletin 1074)

        One of the other origin stories posits that Red Fife is Ukranian in origin as it resembles halychanka, a Ukranian wheat variety. Another story states that it is an accidental hybrid. Interestingly, “government agronomists are convinced that the properties of red fife and its capacity to adapt to the extreme weather conditions mean that it is the only forerunner of cultivated varieties of wheat”. (Quoted from Red Fife’s entry in the 2014 Slow Food Ark of Taste, accessed on Google: https://artsandculture.google.com/exhibit/red-fife-wheat-slow-food/AQWASwkK?hl=en). Regardless of its origin, Red Fife is indeed tough enough to withstand the dry Colorado climate, a rainier-than-usual summer, the neighborhood rabbits, and my two rabbit-chasing terriers.

      • #9428
        Ashley Overstreet
        Participant

        Week 4

        Red Fife is a wheat, so it does contain gluten and isn’t something that individuals with celiac disease can eat. That being said (well, written), Red Fife is one of the varieties that some people with gluten sensitivity say they can eat. From what I understand, we haven’t yet been able to definitively conclude why this is the case: one theory is that the long-fermentation process used with sourdough breads made from heirloom grains makes the gluten easier to digest. Another theory states that modern wheats have somehow been bred to be less digestible than heirloom and ancient wheats.

        Hoping to find something more conclusive about Red Fife, I did a deeper dive on its protein content, based on the results of farmers and millers who’ve sent their grain off for testing. I’m seeing a range between 12% and 15.4%, which makes this a high-protein wheat. There seems to be some confusion on the internet about protein and gluten content, and while trying to find sources that use those terms accurately, I ran across this clarification from Loiselle Organic Farm, whose Red Fife from that season tested out at 12.2% protein: “Contrary to popular belief, Red Fife heritage wheat does not have a lower total gluten content than other newer varieties of bread wheat; this was confirmed by lab testing we commissioned at SunWest Food Laboratories in Saskatoon in 2006.  However, and besides Red Fife’s exceptional taste and baking qualities, we have preliminarily determined (prior to expected laboratory testing) that the gliadin protein level is ~35% of this wheat’s overall gluten protein content. Wheat gluten’s insoluble proteins are gliadin and glutenin. This compares to ~80% gliadin protein levels found in a popular modern bread wheat variety that we last grew in 2003. Elevated gliadin protein levels are primarily what cause people to have allergic reactions/intolerances to most wheat.”

        If anyone knows of a source for comparing the nutritional content of heirloom wheat varieties (or heirloom/ancient vs modern grains), I’d love to see it. I couldn’t find that, but I did find a guide for baking with various heirloom and ancient flours with info on water absorption, best uses, gluten strength, etc: https://breadtopia.com/newbies-guide-to-flour-for-bread-baking/

    • #9073
      Colbert
      Participant

      AAG_Annette_Tibetan Purple Barley, 6 row

      • This reply was modified 2 weeks, 5 days ago by Colbert. Reason: didn't follow instructions
      • #9118
        Colbert
        Participant

        What grain are you choosing?
        Barley, Tibetan Purple, 6 row

        What attracted you to it?
        Love barley in soups, color, 6 row seems like it would produce more grain.

        Fun Fact:
        It is grown in New Mexico

      • #9156
        Renee Fourie
        Keymaster

        My favorite loaf of bread I ever made was with Tibetan Purple Barley and Turkey Red Fife! Thanks for sharing such a lovely photo. How big was the raised bed where you grew all that barley?

        • This reply was modified 2 weeks, 2 days ago by Renee Fourie.
      • #9128
        Colbert
        Participant

        Week2 – Grain VarietyName
        Latin name: Hordeum vulgar
        Chromosomal count: 14
        Ideal growing cond: Zone 3-11, spring or fall planting, pH 6-7, sunny plot
        Pollinated: self, some wind
        Breeding system: self pollinated

        Specific characteristics: 6 row *

    • #9082
      Jen deHaan
      Participant

      AAG_Jen_PurpleValleyBarley

      • #9083
        Jen deHaan
        Participant

        Week 1  – Purple Valley Barley

        What grain are you choosing and what attracted you to it?

        I originally heard Bill talking about Purple Tibetan Barley on a podcast, and I wrote down the name to learn more and find sources for it. I ran across Purple Valley barley at Adaptive Seeds, which is a company I regularly purchase from so I decided to try it. It’s best spring planted, so will be growing it for the first time next spring.

        Fun Fact

        This variety was developed in Oregon, may have been selected from Tibetan Purple, and is less prone to lodging.

        Photo

         

      • #9232
        Jen deHaan
        Participant

        Week 2 – Purple Valley Barley

        • What is the Latin name? Hordeum vulgate
        • What is the chromosomal count? 14, diploid
        • What are the ideal growing conditions? This one is best sown in spring, it will grow in cool ground (cool season). Short season. Prefers dry, and full sun to partial shade.
        • How is it pollinated? Self pollinated with some wind pollination
        • What is the breeding system? Self pollination
        • Any specific characteristics of the grain you have chosen. 6 row and less prone to lodging than other purple barley varieties.

      • #9274
        Renee Fourie
        Keymaster

        Thanks for the progress photo of your germination test! The seedlings look fuzzy.

      • #9292
        Jen deHaan
        Participant

        Yes!! I love all the hairs. So neat to see what we usually don’t get to see 🙂

    • #9141
      Pamela Barosso
      Participant

      AAG_Pam_Einkorn – Week 1

      I decided to pick Einkorn because I am interested in the history of grains which was part of the Natufian culture in 8500 BC.

      • This reply was modified 1 week, 2 days ago by Renee Fourie.
      • #9144
        Pamela Barosso
        Participant

        Week 2

        What is the Latin name? Triticum monococcum
        What is the chromosomal count? 14
        What are the ideal growing conditions? Sunny location with well drained soils but can survive on poor, dry soils.
        How is it pollinated? self-pollinated
        What is the breeding system?self pollination
        Any specific characteristics of the grain you have chosen.  no

      • #9143
        Pamela Barosso
        Participant

        Einkorn

        A picture and more information on Einkorn from the D.Gary Young website https://www.dgaryyoung.com/blog/2015/the-grain-called-einkorn

    • #9267
      Richard
      Participant

      AAG_Richard_BlackEmmer

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